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ESG

Status and Development of Carbon Pricing Worldwide in 2024

Carbon pricing is becoming an increasingly powerful tool in the fight against climate change. Assigning a cost to greenhouse gas emissions, incentivizes businesses and individuals to reduce their carbon footprint. Additionally, with the introduction of the European Union’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM), carbon pricing becomes even more relevant for companies. CBAM imposes a carbon price on imports into the EU, leveling the playing field between EU producers subject to the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) and foreign producers. Notably, carbon prices paid in third countries by the producers will be deducted from the CBAM liability, influencing import costs for CBAM goods. This can also encouraging countries outside of the EU to adopt carbon pricing measures to collect the carbon taxes themself. Overview of Carbon Pricing Carbon pricing can take various forms, the most common being carbon taxes and emissions trading systems (ETS). Carbon Taxes: These directly set a price on carbon by defining a tax rate on greenhouse gas emissions or the carbon content of fossil fuels. For example, Sweden has one of the highest carbon taxes globally, reaching up to USD 137 per ton of CO2. Emissions Trading Systems (ETS): An ETS sets a cap on the total level of greenhouse gas emissions and allows industries with low emissions to sell their extra allowances to larger emitters. The EU ETS is one of the most prominent examples, where prices have exceeded USD 60 per ton of CO2, driving significant emission reductions. Currently, around 24% of global emissions are covered by these carbon pricing mechanisms, marking significant progress over the past decade. Global Trends in Carbon Pricing Over the past ten years, carbon pricing has grown substantially, expanding from covering just 7% of global emissions to nearly a quarter today. This growth reflects the increasing recognition of carbon pricing as an effective tool for reducing emissions. In the past year, there have been key developments, including the introduction of new carbon pricing instruments in countries like Australia, Hungary, and Mexico, as well as significant reforms in existing systems. High and Low Carbon Prices The price of carbon varies significantly across different regions. The European Union's ETS, Switzerland, and Canada are among the regions with the highest carbon prices. In these areas, the carbon price has reached levels that provide strong incentives for reducing emissions. For instance, the EU ETS has seen prices well above USD 60 per ton of CO2, reflecting stringent policies and high ambition levels. On the other end of the spectrum, some regions have lower carbon prices. These include countries that are still in the early stages of implementing carbon pricing or those with less ambitious targets. For example, Indonesia and Ukraine have relatively lower carbon prices but are planning to increase them in the coming years to align with global targets and the Paris Agreement. Revenue from Carbon Pricing In 2023, global revenue from carbon pricing instruments exceeded USD 100 billion for the first time. This revenue is important for funding climate-related programs, supporting general budgets, and redistributing to households and businesses affected by carbon pricing. The majority of this revenue comes from ETSs, primarily due to the large volume of emissions they cover and the relatively high price levels in systems like the EU ETS. Sectoral Coverage and Flexibility Carbon pricing is most commonly applied in the power and industrial sectors, but there is a growing trend of extending these mechanisms to other sectors, such as maritime transport and waste management. Additionally, governments are increasingly using multiple carbon pricing instruments in parallel to expand coverage and increase price levels. For example, some jurisdictions have both an ETS and a carbon tax, targeting different sectors or complementing each other to enhance overall effectiveness. This flexibility allows for more comprehensive and ambitious carbon pricing strategies, tailored to the specific economic and social contexts of different regions. The increasing use of carbon credits to offset liabilities also provides flexibility, enabling entities to meet their obligations in a cost-effective manner while supporting global emission reduction efforts. Challenges and Future Outlook Despite significant progress, there remains a substantial gap between commitments and actual implemented policies. Achieving the Paris Agreement's goals will require stronger political commitment and broader implementation of carbon pricing. This includes expanding coverage to new sectors and increasing carbon prices to levels that drive substantial emission reductions. The future of carbon pricing looks promising, with middle-income countries like Brazil, India, and Türkiye making notable progress towards implementing carbon pricing instruments. Additionally, sector-specific initiatives, such as those for international aviation and shipping, are gaining traction and contributing to the overall expansion of carbon pricing. Conclusion Carbon pricing has made significant progresses over the past decade, but more ambitious and comprehensive policies are needed to meet global climate targets. By understanding the current state and trends of carbon pricing worldwide, stakeholders can better support and advocate for policies that drive effective emission reductions. Staying informed and engaged in these developments is crucial for ensuring a sustainable and livable planet for future generations.  
SupplyOn ESG · 17. July 2024 - reading time < 5 Min.
Status and Development of Carbon Pricing Worldwide in 2024
ESG

Achieving ESG Excellence: How SupplyOn Supports Supply Chain Sustainability

As the number of increasingly stringent ESG regulations from the EU continues to grow, companies are faced with the challenge of rethinking and adapting their business models, production processes, and strategies. Digital tools and platforms play a crucial role in helping businesses meet their ecological responsibilities while maintaining economic competitiveness. One such solution is the ESG Suite from SupplyOn. SupplyOn is a global provider of web-based Supply Chain Management (SCM) solutions, connecting over 140,000 companies worldwide. In response to current challenges, SupplyOn has extended its solution offering with multiple ESG software modules under ESG Suite. SupplyOn’s shareholders include Bosch, Continental, ZF and Schäffler. The ESG Suite: A Comprehensive Toolbox The ESG Suite from SupplyOn offers companies a robust set of tools to address these challenges. It enables centralized management of sustainability data and the integration of ESG-related processes across the entire value chain. This allows companies to meet the required ESG standards, create transparency in the supply chain, and achieve their corporate ESG goals. Designed for companies of all sizes, the ESG Suite ensures a compliant, transparent, and focused transition towards sustainability. Building on SupplyOn's existing network, the suite comprises three pillars: Human Rights Due Diligence (LkSG Risk Manager, CSDDD) and Carbon Management (CCF Calculator, CBAM Manager). Human Rights Due Diligence: LkSG Risk Manager The German Supply Chain Due Diligence Act (LkSG) aims to ensure that human rights and environmental standards are upheld in international supply chains. Implementing these requirements is complex, involving comprehensive risk analysis to identify specific requirements and the company's individual exposure. Risk mitigation measures must be developed and implemented, and their effectiveness must be monitored. The LkSG Risk Manager from SupplyOn addresses these challenges by providing a tool tailored to the LkSG requirements. It helps companies achieve the necessary transparency and documentation, supports risk identification both internally and throughout the supply chain, and enables monitoring and reporting in accordance to legal requirements. Key functionalities include supplier mapping, abstract risk analysis by country and product, concrete risk analysis for high-risk suppliers, implementation of preventative measures for prioritized high risks, remediation actions for identified risks, and the creation of BAFA reports within the tool. Carbon Management: CCF Calculator Understanding and managing a company's carbon footprint (CCF) is crucial for environmental impact assessment. The CCF includes both direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions. Accurate calculation of the CCF helps organizations identify critical areas, set realistic reduction targets, and develop strategies to reduce their carbon footprint, in alignment with international standards like the Greenhouse Gas Protocol (GHG Protocol) and ISO 14064. SupplyOn’s CCF Calculator enables companies to calculate, manage, and report their greenhouse gas emissions according to recognized standards. This tool simplifies the detailed CO2 analysis process, allowing companies to quantify and assess both direct and indirect emissions across all operational areas. Automated reporting features facilitate compliance with disclosure requirements such as ESRS. The tool’s dashboard provide an overview of current and past carbon footprints and track progress toward achieving set targets. Collaborative functionalities support coherent and coordinated climate management efforts within the company. Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism: CBAM Manager The Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) is an EU regulation aimed at preventing carbon leakage by imposing a CO2 price on the import of certain emissions-intensive goods into the EU. Effective since October 1, 2023, CBAM initially mandates reporting obligations, with full implementation requiring companies to purchase CBAM certificates from 2026 onwards. The CBAM Manager from SupplyOn automates data collection and consolidation from suppliers and production sites outside the EU, tracks CO2 prices paid abroad, and calculates remaining emissions to be priced. For reporting, the CBAM Manager generates an XML document that can be directly uploaded to the CBAM transitional registry. SupplyOn's Holistic ESG Solution SupplyOn's ESG Suite provides a holistic solution covering all relevant ESG application areas, ensuring compliance with dynamic regulatory and economic requirements. Future developments will further expand the suite to include additional regulations like the EU Forced Labor Ban, making ESG criteria an essential part of supply chain management. SupplyOn offers webinarsand user training for its ESG tools, ensuring that both customers and their suppliers understand what data needs to be exchanged. Future plans include building extensive educational content and an ESG knowledge hub. By preventing greenwashing through user-friendly tools, comprehensive educational materials, and rigorous validation processes, SupplyOn ensures that its solutions support genuine sustainability efforts. The suite’s integrability with various corporate systems and its capacity to centralize ESG data aim to eliminate fragmentation and provide a single source of ESG data for compliance and transparency. Conclusion SupplyOn's ESG Suite is designed to help companies navigate the complex landscape of ESG compliance. By leveraging digital tools for human rights due diligence, carbon management, and sustainability reporting, businesses can enhance their sustainability efforts, ensure regulatory compliance, and achieve their ESG goals with confidence and clarity. But don't just take our word for it! Hear Dr. Thomas Schulte from Bosch, one of our esteemed customers speaking at the Automotive Decarbonization And Sustainability Summit about their journey towards sustainability with our solutions. Your browser does not support the video tag.
SupplyOn ESG · 11. June 2024 - reading time < 5 Min.
Achieving ESG Excellence: How SupplyOn Supports Supply Chain Sustainability
ESG

Is supplier ESG rating sufficient for ESG compliance?

In today's corporate world, Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) compliance has become not just a benchmark for operational integrity but a cornerstone of modern business practices. As companies increasingly align themselves with the principles of sustainability and ethical governance, ESG compliance serves as a critical measure of their commitment to societal and environmental responsibilities. This alignment not only enhances their reputation but also drives long-term profitability by managing risks and identifying opportunities for innovation. Within the spectrum of ESG practices, supplier ESG ratings emerge as a pivotal tool, providing businesses with essential insights into their suppliers' adherence to ESG standards. These ratings evaluate suppliers on a variety of parameters, including environmental impact, social responsibility, and ethical governance, offering a snapshot of their ESG performance. By utilizing supplier ESG ratings, companies can ensure that their supply chains reflect their own ESG values and commitments, thus fostering a more sustainable and ethical business ecosystem. Understanding ESG Ratings and Compliance What are ESG Ratings? Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) ratings evaluate how well a company manages its responsibilities in these three areas. These ratings, provided by various rating agencies, consider factors such as a company's carbon footprint, labor practices, anti-corruption policies, and board diversity. By quantifying a company’s adherence to ESG principles, these ratings help investors and consumers make informed decisions. Significance of ESG Compliance ESG compliance involves aligning company operations with globally recognized ESG standards and practices. This alignment is critical for corporate sustainability, as it helps businesses mitigate risks, foster innovation, and enhance their market reputation. Compliance is not just about adhering to regulations; it's about integrating sustainable practices that lead to long-term benefits for the company and its stakeholders. The Limitations of Supplier ESG Ratings Scope and Depth of Assessment While ESG ratings provide valuable insights, they often miss nuances specific to industries or regions. For example, a supplier may have a high rating overall but still engage in poor water management practices in arid regions, posing risks that aren't immediately apparent from the rating alone. This limitation highlights the need for a deeper assessment to uncover and address such ESG risks and opportunities comprehensively. Standardization Issues Different ESG rating agencies use various criteria and weightings, leading to inconsistencies that can impact the reliability of these ratings. For instance, two agencies might score the same company differently based on their internal methodologies or the emphasis they place on certain ESG aspects. This lack of standardization can confuse stakeholders and complicate the comparison of ESG performance across companies. Beyond Ratings: The Need for Comprehensive Due Diligence Integrating ESG Into Business Decisions Effective ESG compliance requires integrating ESG considerations into all levels of business decision-making. This integration helps companies anticipate risks and opportunities, and align their strategic objectives with sustainable practices. For example, a company might decide to invest in renewable energy solutions not just to improve its ESG rating but to stabilize long-term energy costs and reduce environmental impact. Dynamic Monitoring and Continuous Improvement ESG factors are dynamic, influenced by evolving regulations, market conditions, and societal expectations. Continuous monitoring and updating of ESG assessments are essential to address these changes. A company might adjust its supply chain practices in response to new labor laws or environmental regulations, ensuring compliance and maintaining a strong ESG standing. Regulatory and Stakeholder Expectations In today's global marketplace, ESG-related regulations are becoming increasingly stringent and complex. To maintain compliance, companies must extend their efforts beyond simple supplier ESG ratings. Understanding and implementing comprehensive frameworks that address specific ESG aspects is crucial. For example, adhering to the EU's Green Deal or the SEC's guidelines on climate disclosures requires a deep integration of these frameworks into corporate strategy, going well beyond initial assessments. Moreover, stakeholders are demanding greater transparency and accountability in ESG practices. Companies can meet these demands by engaging with stakeholders through clear communication, regular ESG reports, and a responsive approach to feedback. Publishing detailed sustainability reports and hosting stakeholder forums are practical ways to enhance transparency and foster an ongoing dialogue around ESG performance. These efforts help build trust and reinforce a company’s commitment to upholding strong ESG principles. Implementing Effective ESG Practices Integrating comprehensive ESG practices into the business model is crucial. This integration involves training employees on ESG issues, updating internal policies to reflect the latest ESG standards, and engaging actively with all stakeholders. For example, a company could implement a rigorous training program on environmental efficiency for its operations team and establish a cross-departmental ESG committee to oversee its sustainability strategies. Conclusion Throughout this exploration, it has become evident that while supplier ESG ratings are invaluable for assessing the environmental, social, and governance practices of suppliers, they are not sufficient on their own to guarantee comprehensive ESG compliance. These ratings provide a useful starting point but often fall short of capturing the full scope of ESG risks and the dynamic nature of compliance needs. They offer a snapshot, yet lack the depth and breadth required to fully address the evolving challenges and opportunities within the wider context of corporate sustainability. For businesses genuinely committed to sustainability and ethical practices, adopting a holistic approach to ESG is imperative. This means not only utilizing supplier ESG ratings but also integrating ESG considerations deeply into all business decisions and operations. Companies need to engage in ongoing due diligence, regular updates to their ESG assessments, and active participation in regulatory and stakeholder dialogues. Only through such comprehensive measures can businesses ensure they meet the stringent demands of modern ESG compliance and contribute positively to a sustainable future.
SupplyOn ESG · 10. May 2024 - reading time < 5 Min.
Is supplier ESG rating sufficient for ESG compliance?
ESG

Why you should consider holistic ESG management

Focusing solely on specific ESG use cases, such as data collection strategies for individual sustainability metrics, rather than adopting a holistic approach to ESG management, significantly risks the effectiveness of meeting broader ESG goals. This fragmented strategy can lead to various pitfalls that not only undermine the effectiveness of sustainability initiatives but also jeopardize the organization's reputation and compliance posture. Here’s a detailed look at why an isolated approach to data collection and ESG goal setting is destined for challenges. 1. Incoherent Data Collection Leads to Gaps in Sustainability Reporting Organizations that approach ESG data collection piecemeal, without a comprehensive strategy, risk collecting inconsistent or incomplete data. This inconsistency can result in significant gaps in sustainability reporting, where key performance indicators (KPIs) are either inaccurately reported or altogether missed. The disjointed data undermine the reliability of sustainability reports, reducing their value to stakeholders and potentially leading to stakeholder mistrust. In addition, synergy effects cannot be exploited 2. Misalignment of Sustainability Goals and Business Objectives An ESG strategy that is not holistic in nature often leads to a unfavorable trade-off between sustainability goals and broader business objectives. For instance, a company might focus on reducing carbon emissions in its operations (a commendable goal) but neglect broader environmental concerns such as waste reduction or water conservation in its supply chain. This narrow focus can result in missed opportunities for comprehensive environmental stewardship and can impede the company's ability to respond to evolving regulatory requirements or stakeholder expectations. 3. Regulatory Compliance Risks The regulatory landscape for ESG is becoming increasingly complex and stringent globally. An isolated approach to ESG management, particularly in data collection and goal setting, poses significant compliance risks. For example, focusing exclusively on the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) without integrating the Lieferkettensorgfaltspflichtengesetz (LkSG) or Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD) into the strategy might lead to non-compliance with these equally important regulations. Non-compliance can result in hefty fines, legal challenges, and reputational damage. 4. Difficulty in Stakeholder Engagement Stakeholders, including investors, customers, and employees, are increasingly demanding comprehensive and transparent ESG practices. A fragmented ESG strategy makes it challenging to effectively engage with these stakeholders, who expect coherent and all-encompassing sustainability initiatives. Failure to meet stakeholder expectations can lead to a loss of trust, affecting customer loyalty, investor confidence, and employee satisfaction. 5. Hindered Long-term Sustainability and Innovation A piecemeal approach to ESG data collection and goal setting limits an organization's ability to innovate and implement long-term sustainability solutions. Without a comprehensive understanding of ESG impacts and opportunities, companies might miss out on innovative technologies or practices that could drive significant improvements in sustainability performance across the board. Conclusion An isolated approach to ESG management, particularly in data collection and goal setting, is fraught with risks that can undermine an organization's sustainability efforts, regulatory compliance, and stakeholder engagement. As the business world increasingly recognizes the importance of holistic and integrated ESG strategies, companies that fail to adapt risk falling behind. Adopting a comprehensive ESG management framework is not just a matter of regulatory necessity but a strategic imperative that can drive long-term sustainability, innovation, and competitive advantage. Explore SupplyOn’s holistic ESG management software by talking to our ESG experts today.
SupplyOn ESG · 25. March 2024 - reading time < 3 Min.
Why you should consider holistic ESG management